My 1999.io Wish List
by Frank McPherson Friday, May 6, 2016

From a writing perspective, what I like most about 1999.io is that it has all the simplicity of EditThisPage, which is how I first started blogging, but it is missing some of what you might call "power user" features that I have become accustomed. 

My hope/expectation is that over time Dave will add some of these features. Here are features/functions that I wish exist in 1999.io:

  • A bookmarklet to easily insert links and quotes into a new blog post. I frequently use the bookmarklet for Fargo to quote someone. A bonus would be the simple support for linking to the source of the quote.
  • Markdown support for formatting that would enable me to format text using mobile browsers. (Read here for more on my testing of 1999.io with Android.) For me, mobile browser support is a main selling point versus Fargo. Fargo works in mobile browsers, but I find it works best in desktop browsers. 
  • A glossary, which is a feature that Fargo and the OPML Editor had for saving snippets of frequently used text or links end easily insert them into your writing. The glossary for linking is similar to how a Wiki links to other pages, and I think this is a very useful feature for writers that is often overlooked. 

From a hosting perspective, what I like most is that it has been easy for me to automate the process of copying the HTML pages created by 1999.io to an Amazon S3 bucket that I can use to host my blog. 

My main issue with how I have Fargo set up is that fargoPublisher needs to be running in order for my blog to be accessible, even though the HTML is stored in an S3 bucket. By default, the 1999.io node app serves HTML from the server's local storage, but it is easy to add a callback script to copy the HTML to S3. This page is served from my cloud server and this page is served from S3. The URL to the S3 site is the one I will promote when I share links.